Monday, January 30, 2006

Oxford Students Forced To Sign Contracts Saying They'll Attend Lectures

Good Lord. All I can say is thank God they didn't have these when I went to college for seven lovely, unproductive years.

4 comments:

Ed Sikov said...

My solution is just to fail students who cut my class. But now I see that without a contract I could be sued. Hmmmm.

Michael in New York said...

Some kid sued successfully in the UK claiming the classes weren't up to snuff. I don't quite see how pledging to go to class changes that. I can see clarifying what services you are providing, but since it's the student's choice whether to go to class or not, why should the school care as long as he/she pays? I thought it was a nanny state sort of measure but apparently it's just to make sure students can't expect any more than the school provides. I guess it is odd you go to college, spend thousands of dollars and there's really no point at which they make clear exactly what you're purchasing.

Ed Sikov said...

Did you know that a syllabus now functions as an effective contract? If you don't spell out your rules and grading policies in writing, you have no legal authority to fail or downgrade a student. I tried to downgrade a student two years ago for bullying another student mercilessly in a discussion section. I was forbidden by the dean, precisely because I hadn't specified that bad behavior would result in downgrading. I am not making this up.

Michael in New York said...

Really? That's really interesting. I had no idea. Does your syllabus mention extra points for being handsome?